Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N4r p199]

El Moral.

SEMIOTTAVA.

Nunca el moral prudente reverdeçe
Hasta que todo el frio sea pasado,[1]
Y tiene nombre que no le mereçe  [M]
Pues neçio (con ser sabio) fuè llamado.[2]

[Marginalia - link to text]Μῶρος.

Notes:

1.  See Pliny, Natural History, 16.25.102: ‘the mulberry is the last of domesticated trees to shoot, and only does so when the frosts are over; for that reason it is called the wisest of trees’.

2.  Reference to a supposed ‘etymology by opposites’: Latin morus ‘mulberry’ was equated with Greek μῶρος ‘fool’, but the tree was considered wise: see note 1.



Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Q4v p248]

Morus.

The mulberry

EMBLEMA CCIX.

Serior at morus numquam nisi frigore lapso
Germinat:[1] & sapiens nomina falsa[2] gerit.

On the other hand, the mulberry is late, and never until the frost is past does it shoot; though wise, it bears a false name.

Notes:

1.  See Pliny, Natural History, 16.25.102: “the mulberry is the last of domesticated trees to shoot, and only does so when the frosts are over; for that reason it is called the wisest of trees”.

2.  nomina falsa, ‘a false name’, reference to a supposed ‘etymology by opposites’: Latin morus ‘mulberry’ was equated with Greek μῶρος ‘fool’, but the tree was considered wise: see note 1.



Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top