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Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[C6r p43]

EX METU RELIGIO, vel VEXATIO DAT INTELLECTUM.

RELIGION COMES FROM FEAR, or TROUBLE BREEDS GOOD SENSE.

Diluvio (ut cernis) totum stagnante per orbem,
Sunt duo in excelsis montibus incolumes.
Numina qui Diuűm sacras venerantur ad aras,
Effund˙ntque pias ore tremente preces.[1]
Arguit hoc, homines demum meminisse Deorum:
Adversis metuunt c¨m mala temporibus,
C¨mque pericla vident: fieri tunc Relligiosos
Ceu timor efficiat solus in orbe Deos.

The whole world is covered by flood, and two stand safe in the high mountains, who worship the divine powers at the altar, and pour out pious prayers from their trembling lips. This attests that men, in the end, remember the gods in bad times when they fear evil and see dangers: they turn religious, just as if fear alone were able to make gods in this world.

Notes:

1. áDeucalion, son of Prometheus, and his wife Pyrrha, were the sole survivors of the great flood of Greek mythology. Afterwards they prayed at the temple of Jupiter in thanks. Among others, see Apollodorus, 1.7.2, and Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.260.



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